Mar
3
7:00 pm19:00

Hayes Carll

$150

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

I’m a singer-songwriter.
I think “Lovers and Leavers” comes closer to reflecting that than any other record I’ve made. I didn’t worry about checking boxes, making sure there was something here for everybody, or getting on the radio.
I just took some much needed deep breaths and let them out on tape.
It’s been a while since my last album by some measurements of time. Not history of the universe time, or getting a bill through congress time, but in the lives of dogs and recording artists, five years and fifty-three days is only a little less than an eternity.
I went through a divorce. I fell in love.
Changes were made, realizations were realized, and life was lived.
But, I kept on writing songs, on my own and with a cast of accomplished characters who combined their own stories and perspectives with mine.
Songs about my friends.
Songs about my son.
Songs about beginnings and endings.
Songs about songs.
Songs about acceptance and regret.
Songs about lovers and leavers.
With these songs in hand, I needed a co-conspirator to help me get them to you.
I called on Joe Henry, a gentleman poet and an elegant artist who seemed a trustworthy steward for my collection.
We recorded this record live in five days, using just an acoustic guitar, a mix of bass, percussion, pianos and organs, and a touch of pedal steel.
I didn’t have one song that I knew would be a sing along or would make people dance. I felt vulnerable in a way that I hadn’t in a long time. But I got what I wanted – a record with space, nuance, and room to breathe. It felt right for my art. It felt right for my life.
“Lovers and Leavers” isn’t funny or raucous. There are very few hoots and almost no hollers.
But it is joyous, and it makes me smile.
No, it’s not my “Blood on the Tracks,” nor is it any kind of opus.
It’s my fifth record — a reflection of a specific time and place.
It is quiet, like I wanted it to be.
Like I wanted to be.
Hayes Carll

Hit Songs Include: She Left Me for Jesus, Another Like You and Drunken Poet's Dream

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Mar
5
7:00 pm19:00

Lee Roy Parnell

$130

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Lee Roy Parnell is part of a long line of Texas roots-music eclectics and is among the elite few who can be identified as a triple threat. An ace guitarist, as well as a distinctive singer, and hit songwriter, his music runs the gamut of diversity. Combining the influences of Blue-Eyed Soul, Delta Blues, Road House Rock, Southern Boogie, Texas Swing, and Gospel, Parnell's sound defies conventional classification. He draws from a broad range of musical sources and combines them with seamless dexterity and, unlike many other hard-topigeonhole artists, Parnell has enjoyed a run of success on the country and blues charts.

Parnell was born in Abilene, TX, on December 21, 1956, and grew up on his parents’ ranch. His father had toured with a teenage Bob Wills in traveling medicine shows, and Lee Roy’s first public performance came on Wills’ radio show at age six. As a teenager, he played drums in a local band and soon picked up guitar as well, eventually concentrating on slide playing. He joined Kinky Friedman’s Texas Jewboys in his late teens and moved to Austin in 1974 to join the city’s budding music scene. Parnell spent over a decade playing clubs in Austin, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, and New York while honing his style and songwriting.

Lee Roy moved to Nashville in 1987, where he quickly landed a publishing contract with Polygram Music, and a regular spot at the famed Bluebird Cafe. In 1989, he signed to Clive Davis' Arista Records, led by friend and mentor, Tim Dubois. Produced by Barry Beckett, of the world-famous Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, Parnell's self-titled debut album featured a collection of horn-driven country-soul. It received good reviews but didn’t break him commercially; that would happen with 1992′s Love Without Mercy, which emphasized Parnell’s searing slide guitar skills. “What Kind of Fool Do You Think I Am” and “Tender Moment” both went to number two on the charts, and the title track also made the Top Ten. 1993′s On the Road produced two more Top Tens with its title track and “I’m Holding My Own.” The Hank Williams / Ray Charles hit, “Take These Chains From My Heart” also made the Top 20.

In 1995, Lee Roy was asked to help launch Arista's sister label, Career Records, with the release of We All Get Lucky Sometimes. The album spawned two Top Five hits in “A Little Bit of You” and “Heart’s Desire” and featured duets with Trisha Yearwood and Mary Chapin Carpenter. "A Little Bit of You" was also a #1 hit on the Radio and Records Magazine charts; a first for a brand new label. During this time, Parnell's sound was becoming more defined by roots and soul music. He was also allowed the creative freedom to record with some of his heroes, such as Tex-Mex accordionist Flaco Jimenez. Their collaboration on the track "Cat Walk" garnered a Grammy Nomination for Best Country

Instrumental. Parnell released "Every Night's A Saturday Night" in 1997. The album included another duet with Trisha Yearwood and the Grammy nominated boogie-woogie instrumental, "Mama Screw Your Wig On Tight," which was written and produced by Lee Roy and his entire band, "The Hot Links" (James Pennebaker / Kevin McKendree / Lee Roy Parnell / Lynn Williams / Stephen Mackey). Next up was Parnell's "Hits and Highways Ahead" in 1999. Lee Roy's recording of the Son House tune, "John The Revelator," featuring the "Fairfield Four," garnered a CMA nomination for Vocal Event of The Year. The album also included the popular track "Honky Tonk Night Time Man," handpicked and sent to him by Lee Roy's good friend and mentor, the legendary Merle Haggard. An official video was also produced for the song "Lucky You, Lucky Me."

Following his deal at Arista and Career, Parnell was ready to expand his musical horizons and partnered up with the rootsy Vanguard label in Los Angeles. His debut album with them was 2001′s Tell the Truth, which was recorded at the world-renowned Muscle Shoals Sound by Johnny Sandlin (chief engineer for Capricorn Records and The Allman Brothers Band). In keeping with his quest for more artistic freedom, he teamed back up with Universal South in 2006, to return to the studio to record Back to the Well.

This album delved even further into his blues and southern soul roots. With the release of this album, Parnell received some very rare support from Gibson Guitars with a series of guitar clinics interwoven with tour dates across the country in a custom Gibson tour bus. Lee Roy's relationship with Gibson and the Les Paul is not a new one. Parnell's first Goldtop was a 1956 model he bought when he was 15-years-old and was his only guitar well into his 30's. Although he experimented for a few years after that with different guitars, searching for his own sound, he ultimately returned to his first love, the 1956 Les Paul Goldtop in 2001 and helped Gibson reinvigorate the model. Talks then came about to develop a Lee Roy Parnell signature model and culminated with a final eight months of arduous development, producing Gibson's Lee Roy Parnell Signature '57 Les Paul Goldtop. You can read more information about the guitar at gibson.com.

The year 2011 brought Lee Roy Parnell what is probably his most cherished honor to date, when he was inducted into the Texas Heritage Songwriter's Hall of Fame. Parnell continues to produce and write with some of the most influential songwriters and recording artists nationwide as co-partner in his music publishing company, Dean Parnell Music, and is currently preparing for his first independent release.

Hit Songs Include: What kind of fool do you think I am?, Tender Moment and Heart's Desire

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Mar
8
7:00 pm19:00

The John Conlee Show

$200

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

John Conlee is a lot like the songs of which he sings.  He lives a domestic life with his wife Gale and three children, Rebecca, Jessica and Johnny.  During the past two decades, John Conlee has achieved a level of success that he has sustained by simply being himself and by making records that the listening public can relate to.  He is a gifted entertainer, but he’s not into the glitz and hype of the entertainment world.  He’d rather spend his “off the road” time working on his 32 acre farm outside of Nashville or engaging in his woodworking and gunsmithing hobbies. 

Born and raised in Kentucky farm country, John Conlee grew up plowing fields, slopping hogs, harvesting grain, raising tobacco and tending cattle.  He began his crusade to save the family farm system several years ago, performing a concert in Omaha, Nebraska in June 1985 as a benefit for the National Farmers Organization.  When Willie Nelson announced his plans for the Farm Aid concerts, John called and offered his services.  John Conlee has since been part of 9 Farm Aid concerts, which have raised 13 million dollars to aid the family farmer.

“I certainly didn’t help to organize the entertainers and the concerts for the publicity,” allows Conlee, “I wanted to help bring attention to the crisis affecting this nation’s family farms.  With the help of Willie and others, we brought the family problems to the forefront and some changes began to take place.

“I’m not a radical or a rebel,” Conlee continues, “but I will stand up and speak my mind on issues that I feel affect me, my family and others, and the farm crisis was, and remains, one of those issues.” 

John Conlee’s success began in the late 70’s.  Signed to ABC Records after working in radio for a number of years, Conlee was ready to make records rather than just sit back and spin them.

His first release, “Back Side Of Thirty” went no where fast.  Three more singles also met with a minimum success, although they all charted.  But in March of 1978, the label released “Rose Colored Glasses,” a song Conlee wrote, which became a huge hit as well as his signature song.  In January of 1979, the label re-released “Back Side Of Thirty” which went on to become a No. 1 record, and the hits continued to roll.  The John Conlee hit list includes songs such as “Lady Lay Down,” “Before My Time,” “Friday Night Blues,” “Miss Emily’s Picture,” “Busted,” “I Don’t Remember Loving You,” “Common Man,” “I’m Only In It For The Love,” “In My Eyes,” “As Long As I’m Rocking With You,” “Years After You,” “Domestic Life,” “Mama’s Rockin’ Chair,” “Hit The Ground Runnin’” and “Fellow Travelers.”  All of Conlee’s hits have that unmistakable common thread – that unique voice. 

Unlike many artists today, there are several aspects of John Conlee’s career that have remained constant.  His career has been managed from the beginning by Dave Roberts and all his records have been produced by Bud Logan.  In the entertainment world where artists change managers, agents and producers almost as often as they change their socks, John Conlee has not tampered with success.  He has remained loyal and constant with the people who have helped him from the beginning – which tells you quite a bit about the man with the rose colored glasses. 

Overall, there have been 29 single releases throughout the years with 26 of them charting in the top 20 or better.  Eight of those 26 have reached the coveted No. 1 spot on the national country charts.

His record tenure, beginning at ABC Records, brought him to MCA Records when the two labels merged.  John also recorded for Columbia Records where he scored four hit singles before signing with Nashville’s 16th Avenue Records, a division of the Opryland Music Group.  This was something of a homecoming for Conlee, who has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1981.

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Mar
11
7:00 pm19:00

Redd Volkaert

$110

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Redd Volkaert was a successor to Roy Nichols in Merle Haggard's backing band, and is among the country’s top Telecaster guitar slingers. Volkaert won a 2009 Grammy for Best Country Instrumental Performance.

While best known as a Fender Telecaster player, with a personal collection that includes a 1953 Fender Telecaster, a 1951 Fender Nocaster, a 1958 Fender Esquire and a 1950s-style Hahn Telecaster. Volkaert has lent his name to guitars made by other companies, including Asher.

Redd's band has been playing Saturdays, and Redd plays with Haybale!, the Sunday night house band, at The Continental Club in Austin, Texas.

Hit Songs Include: It's a Minor Thing, Tube'n and Telewacker

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

John Anderson
Mar
12
7:00 pm19:00

John Anderson

$190

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

To put it simply, John Anderson is one of the greatest country music singers to ever step up to the microphone, possessing one of the most instantly recognizable vocal instruments in the history of the genre.

On his latest album Goldmine, released on his own Bayou Boys label, Anderson has completed a long overdue record of original songs. The award-winning songwriter wrote or co-wrote 12 of the album's 13 tracks. That will bring joy to the hearts of some of the most devoted fans in country music. Goldmine is also a record that, given the current state if contemporary country, could, like Cash and Haggard before him, find a home amid lovers of authentic music of any genre. Though he would never compare himself to his heroes, the fact is, John Anderson is now the standard bearer for traditional country music, of the 100 Proof variety.

Raised in Apopka, Fla., Anderson was exposed to both rock and traditional country growing up and, as incendiary rock outfits like Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and Lynyrd Skynyrd honed their chops around him, learned to love (and play) both types of music. But Anderson resisted the call of rock 'n roll, electing rather to pursue his country music dreams. It was the traditional country ballads that lured him in and changes music history, songs like Porter Waggoner's "Green, Green Grass of Home." "I loved those type of ballads," Anderson says, "to the point I didn't want to get away from it.

Anderson moved to Nashville in 1972, working contruction by day (including as a roofer at the Grand Ole Opry House) and playing the honky-tonks at night. He signed to Warner Bros. in 1977, and notching his first major hit in 1980 with Billy Jo Shaver's "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I'm Gonna Be a Diamond Someday)." Other hits, including the classic "Wild and Blue" in 1982, solidified his status as a powerful new voice in country music. "Swingin'," written by Anderson and Lionel Delmore, blew the roof off a year later, exploding to No.1 on the Billboard Country chart, propelling Anderson to the CMA Horizon Award, and becoming one of the most enduring hits in the country canon.

Anderson plowed through the ebbs and flows of country music (and the country music business) throughout the '80s, and in the early 1990s engineered one of the greatest "comeback" runs (he never really left) in the history of the genre. Seminole Wind, released on BNA, produced hit singles in "Straight Tequila Night," "When It Comes To You," "Money in the Bank," and the stirring title cut. The latter would have never been released had Anderson not stuck to his guns, a familiar refrain throughout his career as the artist has wound his way through virtually all of Nashville's major labels. 

No such clashed occurred in creating Goldmine, an album cut with the artist in complete control. Produced by Anderson with longtime collaborator Joe Spivey, Goldmine is an artist achievement, recorded the way the singer intended. "With Goldmine, I thought, first off, I'm going to take my songs into the studio and make a record like I think it ought to be made, without all those other influences," he says. "I really don't need a lot of help to make a John Anderson record, and this record pretty much proces that. In fact, I'm more pleased with the sound of this record than I have been in a long time.

It's easy to see why. Goldmine has generous helpings of everything John Anderson does well and he does a lot of things very well. The record has it all: a swampy cautionary anthem in the crowd-rousing "Freedom Isn't Free," rollicking mid-tempos like the roadhouse boogie (and Merle Haggard-penned) "Magic Mama," "I Work A Lot Better," and the hook-laden title cut. Deeply moving ballads in the traditional country style in "Back Home," and "I Will Cross O'er the River." And an abundance of romance in the haunting "Happily Ever After," and, in contemplative tribute to fans, "You All Are Beautiful."

Then ther are the indefinable, compelling set pieces that only John Anderson could deliever. "Louisiana Son of a Beast," with its swagger, swamp cats and wild hogs, is an exercise in backwoods mythology. "Holdin' On" is a regret-drenched ballad in the vein of "I just Came Home to Count the Memories." The wistful "On and On and On...," builds a panoramic musical soundscape.

Beyond the inspired vocals and ambitions songwriting (Anderson was inducted to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame on Oct. 5, 2014), the singer credits his handpicked studio musicians with the tasteful authenticity of Goldmine, which boasts a musicality light years from the over-produced bombast frequently found on contemporary country airwaves. “It’s all about knowing the right guys to call, and most all of the guys that played on this record are old friends, aside from being great musicians,” Anderson says, adding that he’s not keen on having the studio players take their cues from demos or scratch vocals. Instead, Anderson plays the song live in the studio and lets the pickers do what they do.

“For the most part, all my bigger records have been cut that way,” he explains. “I don’t want a fully-orchestrated demo trying to tell these guys what to do, all they get out of that is the interpretation of what some others guys have played. Why would you call your favorite players in the world and try to tell them to play like so-and-so played on the demo? I think that would be very foolish, myself. I want that record to be about that song. I play it just how I want it, and then me and Joe would figure out who would take the solos and the fills.”
The end result, “is the real [thing], Anderson decrees. “Creativity as it happens.”
Which is the best way to experience John Anderson: un-distilled, the way he has historically been able to cut records “only when I could get away with it,” he says, “and then all of a sudden we need more direction. Through 40 years, I’ll say this, I did my best work when I wasn’t directed or ‘helped’ by anybody else. The records show. I mean they really show.”

Despite his music biz travails, Anderson, who has made his home in Smithville, TN, for more than 30 years, is far from a bitter man. Rather, he feels more than blessed, and subscribes to the mentality expressed in Goldmine’s compelling “Don’t forget to Thank the Lord.”

“I’m real lucky that songs like ‘Swingin’ or ‘Seminole Wind’ ever even got on the record or were released as singles, and the people that were working with me at the time could tell you that’s true,” he says, recalling epic studio battles fought, “strictly over the music and the songs. It wasn’t because I was an ass or an addict or nothing else. Strictly over the music. And if it ever comes up again, I’ll still fight like hell for the music. The difference is, now I can fight with myself. So it’s becoming quite the short fight.”

Perhaps, and a long, storied journey. In a Country Music Hall of Fame-worthy career that has produced 23 albums, more than 60 singles (20 reaching the Top 10), and a wealth of industry awards, Goldmine proves that there’s still a lot of gold in John Anderson. Now, two decades past the dizzying heights of Seminole Wind, Anderson’s motivations have shifted fully from commercial aspirations to unimpeded artistic integrity. “At this point, it’s just for me and the fans,” he says. “A best-case scenario for me is that the fans that have loved our music and have supported us for many years, if they know Goldmine is out there and can get it, I’ll be happy.”
Anderson knows in his heart that fans of traditional country music “could use a record like this really bad right now,” he asserts. “People ask what’s happened to country music, well, nothing’s happened to it. It’s just being overshadowed by ‘bro country’ right now. I’m just glad they found a name for it.”

An unrepentant road dog, Anderson’s touring career has never wavered, as he and his crack band play to packed houses filled with “the most loyal fans anybody ever have, and I do indeed appreciate them supporting our music for all these years,” he says. “Their love of the music, has only gotten better.”
He adds that it’s still a thrill when he hears the words, “Ladies and gentlemen, John Anderson,” and marvels that, more often than not, the crowds stands up and cheer on just those words. “That’s something in my younger days I never really dreamed I’d see,” he says with a laugh, “a standing ovation before ever you ever open your mouth. Man, sometimes you just want to wave and smile real big, ‘thank you very much, I don’t guess we can beat that. That was great, God bless, and thank you, have a good evening!’”

In short, though the creative fires still burn, John Anderson is a satisfied man, confident in his art, as evidenced in the power of Goldmine, a record done on his terms. “All those people I fought with over the music, most of them are dead now, or retired, they don’t even have nothing to do with music now,” he says. “I’m still plowing away, man, and I love it”

Hit Songs Include: Swingin', Seminole Wind and Black Sheep

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Glenn Leonard’s Temptations Revue
Mar
18
7:00 pm19:00

Glenn Leonard’s Temptations Revue

$200

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Glenn Leonard, who was the lead tenor of the Temptations from 1975-83, recorded on 10 albums with the group, appeared on numerous TV specials world-wide, and circled the globe many times over, is paying the ultimate tribute to those he sang with and learned from with the Mighty Temptations! He's well-known as the beautiful voice on the internationally famous version of the classic Tempts version of "Silent Night," and also was with the Temptations Reunion tour / album that also featured Dennis Edwards, Richard Street, and original members Otis Williams, Melvin Franklin, Eddie Kendricks, and David Ruffin.  
 

Glenn and his all-star cast (who all are accomplished recording artists in their own right, including longtime former Temptations bass singer, Joe Herndon) have a show that is full of high energy and choreography, and they perform all the classic hits such as “My Girl,” “Just My Imagination,” “Can’t Get Next To You” and “Papa Was A Rolling Stone”

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Mar
25
7:00 pm19:00

Shawn Mullins

$135

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Singer-songwriter Shawn Mullins readily admits that several of the songs on his new album, My Stupid Heart, address his perceived relationship failures. In fact, many were written as he was falling out of his third marriage; in the title tune, he actually chides himself for being such a romantic. But it's also a bit of a joke, he says, because he firmly believes in following his heart — no matter where it leads.

That oh-so-fallible, yet essential part of our being is, it turns out, the guiding force behind just about every song on the album — the theme of which, he says, is summed up most succinctly by another song title: "It All Comes Down to Love."

In that respect, Mullins says, it's not all that different from most of his discography — which includes 1998's Soul's Core, the album that shot him to fame on the strength of its Grammy-nominated No. 1 hit, "Lullaby," and 2006's 9th Ward Pickin' Parlor, which contained his AAA/Americana No. 1, "Beautiful Wreck." (He also co-wrote the Zac Brown Band's No. 1 country tune, "Toes.") But in the years since his last release, 2010's Light You Up, Mullins has experienced more ups and downs on his romantic roller-coaster — a ride he's decided to step off for a while. He's also stayed busy co-parenting his son, Murphy, with his second wife.

Still, nothing inspires songwriters quite like a breakup, and Mullins confirms, "This record came out of all that; all the feelings, all the heartache."

He remembers sitting on his porch one afternoon, thinking, "I know this is all in my head, but it'd be a lot easier just to blame it on my heart.' And then I thought, Yeah, it's my stupid heart.'" Next thing he knew, lines like "my stupid heart it plays for keeps/through hoops of fire it bounds and leaps" just started tumbling out. In the studio, the song took on a classic vibe, with impeccable instrumentation and production that sounds as if George Martin supervised.

In other words, it's gorgeous. And it carries a momentum that shifts it away from feeling like a woe-is-me wallow in self-pity. Throughout the album, Mullins deftly balances songs of suffering — from the title tune and "Go and Fall," to the powerful, yet subtle social commentary of "Ferguson" (which contains no mention of guns or police officers) — with songs such as "Roll on By," co-written with Max Gomez, which strikes an upbeat note of hope.

Hit Songs Include: Lullaby, Light You Up and My Stupid Heart

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Apr
6
7:00 pm19:00

Cary Morin

$90

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

“One of the best acoustic pickers on the scene,” Cary Morin brings together the great musical traditions of America and beyond like no other. Deft fingerstyle guitar, vocals that convey melodic elation and gritty world-weariness, Morin crafts a style often characterized as acoustic Native Americana with qualities of blues, bluegrass, jazz, jam, and reggae.

"A man and a guitar, a lot of soul, and an understanding of the history of soulful men with guitars in American music can sometimes achieve this kind of timelessness in their work…,” comments Richard Higgs (Public Radio Tulsa). “Morin has the chops. [His] performances… would stand out, variously, among the old-school delta blues pliers, the Greenwich Village folk crowd at the end of the 1950s, the back-to-nature bards of the late '60s, or today's thriving scene. Morin references all these styles, but he's no dilettante. His engaging sound is his alone...."

Hit Songs Include: Sing It Louder, Tony Town and Old Guitar

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Apr
8
7:00 pm19:00

Violin Femmes Starring Bella Strings

$260

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Bella Electric Strings, led by ROCK violinist and arranger Nina DiGregorio, has rocked audiences worldwide with their blistering solos, unique arrangements—not to mention their beauty and charm. The girls have performed with some of the biggest names in the business, from BEYONCE to SHAKIRA to ANDREA BOCELLI, and have appeared on AMERICA’S GOT TALENT SEASON 1. Bella Electric Strings were recently featured in a DAVID FOSTER AND FRIENDS concert alongside the legendary songwriter and producer.

The girls perform on Yamaha instruments and their music can be heard during many Yamaha String Educator clinics. Recently, the girls were the featured string quartet for Richard Marx, backing him up for his Las Vegas all acoustic show. The girls also comprised most of the string sections for both the YELLOW BRICK ROAD SYMPHONIC ROCK SHOW as well as legendary rockers DEEP PURPLE, at the Pearl Theatre in Las Vegas. They have opened for the vast array of talent, including CHARLIE DANIELS and MICHAEL MCDONALD. They keep a busy corporate schedule and are one of the most sought-after acts in North America.

Violin Femmes takes Bella Strings to a whole new level. All-new arrangements, original material, a live rock band, video, lights, choreography, comedy, and some more surprises can be expected in this high-energy show that leaves audiences awed. The only one of its kind, there are no other similar string acts operating at this level of production. Be prepared for something that you have not yet seen the likes of.

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Apr
20
7:00 pm19:00

Michael Allman, Son of Gregg Allman

$130

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Michael Allman is the 1st born son of Legendary Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member of the Allman Brothers, Greg Allman. Michael’s bluesy soulful voice and look is very reminiscent of his father in his prime! Michael has shared the stage with many well-known artists through the years and continues to put smiles on the faces of his fans every time he gets on stage and starts belting out the sounds.

“Hard Labor Creek” - If Michael’s evocative singing was the only attraction on Michael Allman’s Hard Labor Creek, it would still be worth hearing, but there is a lot more going on than that. Some of the most gifted musicians in Georgia, from young slide guitar phenom Tony Tyler to Motown alumnus and keyboard legend Ike Stubblefield, contribute to the overall sound of this remarkable record. Tyler’s slide and keyboard work are an essential part of the sound of Hard Labor Creek, adding just the right touch without overpowering the song. Stubblefield kicks serious butt here, showing why he is a first-call session player, and his production contribution is one reason this CD sounds so darn good. Soulful backing vocals by Atlanta local favorite Diane Durrett and percussion from Derek Trucks Band drummer Yonrico Scott flesh out the songs. The one and only Col. Bruce Hampton also makes a memorable cameo appearance.

While Michael Allman’s Hard Labor Creek stands on its own merits, he isn’t ashamed of his heritage, and there are several references to his famous father. “Laid Back” written by Sonny Tackett, was inspired by Gregg’s classic album of the same name. “If Dreams Were Money” was actually written for Gregg years ago by veteran Boston musician Bruce Marshall. Still, the spotlight is firmly on Michael, who wrote four of the songs on the CD, and delivers each tune with the kind of thoughtful approach that squeezes the inner meaning out of every word. The lyrics in songs like “Running Alone Again”, “It Ain’t Me” and “Circus Full of Clowns” address universal topics like love and loss in a way that any listener can relate to.

Hit Songs: If Dreams Were Money, Circus Full of Clowns, and Laid Back

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Apr
21
7:00 pm19:00

Tameca Jones

$110

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

When local Austin, TX native Tameca Jones opens her mouth and sings, jaws hit ground. Her honeyed and powerful vocals have been captivating her hometown for a little over ten years. She began melting faces in 2005 when she joined Austin based band 8 Million Stories as the group’s lead singer and songwriter. The band made a name for itself playing in and around Austin and got a publishing deal with Riptide Publishing. Tameca was a part of the band for 2 1/2 years before the band called it quits. This left her without someone to help her create original music. So, she turned to covers to continue playing, grow her audience, and pay the bills.

Tameca spent years skillfully and tastefully breathing new life into the music of others. She made a name for herself as the “Queen of Austin Soul,” blowing minds with her tasteful and vibrant interpretations of a diverse list of artists that include Tina Turner, Nirvana, Elton John, Jimi Hendrix, and more. The Austin Chronicle called her interpretations “sonic pretzels” that “juxtapose(s) crunchy jaggedness with her infectious, honeyed voice.” Her WTF ability to go from soulful wailing to silky coos has won her devoted fans, accolades, and some high profile situations opening for Austin super stars Gary Clark Jr.Max FrostBob Schneider and other big touring acts. She received major love from Billboard Magazine for her white hot performance at the 2015 Austin Music Awards, where she paid tribute to late beloved musician Ian McLagan alongside legends like Steven Van ZandtCharlie SextonAlejandro Escovedo, and Patty Griffin. Billboard said she “raised the roof,” while The Austin Chronicle called her performance “showstopping.”

Guitar deity and fellow Austinite Gary Clark Jr., who faithfully attended Tameca’s shows whenever he was in town, asked her to sing on the song “Wings” for his latest album, The Story of Sonny Boy Slim. Rolling Stone called the song a “slinky duet,” while Andy Langer for Esquire Magazine called the song one of the best songs in the month of September and noted that “the tweaky processing of Austin soul starlet Tameca Jones’ voice adds an early-Parliament-like trippiness.”

Tameca made her festival debut at the 2015 Austin City Limits Festival. Austin360 wrote that her “big, sweet, soulful voice” kicked off the festival in the most epic of ways. Her music filled the morning air and the crowd around her grew bigger and bigger as her set went on. She ended the set with her debut single, “Hot and Bothered,” a Motown inspired cut produced by Josh Moore (Max Frost). The track is on both Spotify and iTunes. The music discovery website PureVolume debuted the single on their page and remarked that the song made it “easy to see why so many see the potential in the singer.” Independent music site, The Joy of Violent Movement, called “Hot and Bothered” “a sexy and slinky and old-school soul-inspired” song that is “contemporary and upbeat.”

Tameca Jones is set to release her highly anticipated debut EP in February. There is little doubt that she will soon be the next big name to break out of Texas.

Hit Songs Include: Hot and Bothered, Let Me Be and Anytime

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Apr
22
7:00 pm19:00

Andy Gross (2 shows in one day)

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Andy Gross is one of the hottest stand up comic, magician and ventriloquist working today as evidenced by his sold out shows and devoted following! His videos have over 100 Million views and counting on the internet! He performs over 150 shows a year at comedy clubs, Las Vegas, cruise ships, fortune 500 corporate events, colleges and performing arts theaters everywhere. He is considered one of the best by his peers in the entertainment industry and he will leave you spellbound. You may recognize him from his numerous TV appearances, including most recently The Ellen show and an NBC television special featuring his talents.
Andy is multi-talented entertainer that currently combines stand up comedy, magic and ventriloquism successfully together making him one of the most sought after corporate entertainers in the world. Audiences are absolutely unanimous in their praise of this amazing performer. His ad-libs during his stand-up are compared frequently to Don Rickles and Robin Williams. His voice throwing is amazing to hear and only a few people in the world can throw their voice, it is must hear to believe!

His achievements go beyond entertainment because by the age of 15 Andy Gross became the youngest professional racquetball player in the history of the sport, when racquetball was at its peak in popularity. He won more professional tournaments in Southern California than any player in the history of the sport. Together with his brother David, who was also a pro, have won over 60 first place doubles tournaments. He remained on the pro tour until he retired at age 26 to devote full time to entertainment.

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

May
6
7:00 pm19:00

Omar & the Howlers

$99

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Austin, besides being the Texas state capital, is home to much of the best in American roots music. Since the 1970s, gutsy blues players, renegade country pickers, and raw-voiced rockers have mixed & matched their musical styles in Austin ’s thriving club scene. And that’s where Kent “Omar” Dykes holds court too.

He hails from McComb, Miss. , a town with the distinction of being home turf for Bo Didley. Omar started playing guitar at seven, took to hanging out in edge-of-town juke joints at 12, joined his first band at 13 – the next youngest player being 50 – and started honing his music. He was still Kent Dykes in those days, but by the time he hit 20 he had hooked up with a crazy party band, called the Howlers, looking back, he says, “We had two saxophone players on baritone and tenor who wore Henry Kissinger masks. They were called the Kissinger Brothers. Not on every song, mind you. Sometimes it was Dolly Parton playing saxophone. Or Cher. And we had these cardboard cutouts from record stores for skits.” They even did fake ads for Sunshine Collard Greens and Howlers’ Fried Chicken – “for that old-fashioned taste that tastes just like Grandma.”

Besides the songwriting collaborators, Omar also brought some friends into the recording studio, including guitarists Chris Duarte and Jon Dee Graham (True Believers), Chris Layton and Tommy Shannon of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s Double Trouble, George Rains (Sir Douglas Quintet and house drummer on scores of Antone’s label releases) and his frequent running-mates Terry Bozzio (Missing Persons, Jeff Beck, Frank Zappa) and Malcolm “Papa Mali” Welbourne.

Hit Songs Include: Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, East Side Blues and Border Girl

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

May
13
7:00 pm19:00

Dream Night Talent Search

$125 to Attend, Free to Register!

VIDEO DEADLINE - April 1st

Dream Night Talent Search is an opportunity for emerging artists to showcase their talent for a chance to win cash prizes and a huge amount of exposure in the Music Industry.

Registration is SIMPLE- Artists can submit a video of themselves performing, then the public will rate each artist and industry judges will review & make the final decision!

The TOP rated or invited artists in each region will then be selected for a chance of 2 days of mentoring, auditioning in the city of their choice and of course, the GRAND PRIZE.

GRAND PRIZE Winners will receive:

  • A private audition to America's Got Talent
  • Cash prizes totaling $2,000
  • Professional video of a live performance
  • Extensive offline and online social media promotion
  • FEATURES with online magazines & radio shows

Dream Night Talent Search started as the dream of one woman, owner of Utopia Artists Wendy Kay who has a passion for finding new talent globally that are “hiding in plain sight.” She also has a resolve to give them a shot at the “big time”. With the help of Paul Kasofsky of Rainbow ManagementGary Alan of TalentWatch, and other behind-the-scenes industry friends and associates, Dream Night Talent Search provides huge opportunities for artists to garner valuable exposure in the industry and build their fan base, as well as compete for the amazing prizes.

In 2014 the winners performed with a America’s Got Talent 2011 winner Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. At the Canadian Dream Night competition the winner performed with Jeff Cook of Alabama! So what are you waiting for... ENROLL TODAY.

May
14
7:00 pm19:00

Roy Book Binder

$90

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Roy has the goods: the original, the bare-knuckle, the low-down . . . blues. Who can say they were friends with the Rev. Gary Davis and Pink Anderson? And toured with Arthur Big Boy Crudup, Hot Tuna & Bonnie Raitt ?  Roy can. He has the stories, the licks, and the mystery of timeless music in his fingers. He’s been featured on a PBS special and interviewed by Terry Gross on “Fresh Air.”  He’s also a regular at Fur Peace Ranch, where he teaches along with Jorma Kaukonen and others. When he brings his  'Tour Bus'  to town, a one-man blues-fest ensues. He plays and he entertains, feeding us music and stories, and the evening is a celebration for us all. We’re privileged to have Roy here to preserve–and extend—the tradition of great American blues music. (JAMES HIPPA)

Hit Songs Include: Travelin' Man, Rag Mama and New Age Women Blues

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

May
19
7:00 pm19:00

Ruthie Foster

$165

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Ruthie Foster is an American singer-songwriter of blues and folk music. She mixes a wide palette of American song forms, from gospel and blues to jazz, folk and soul, and her live performances are powerfully transfiguring.

Hoping to travel and gain a wider world perspective, Foster joined the Navy, and soon her musical talents soon had her singing in the naval band Pride, that played pop and funk hits at recruitment drives in the southeastern United States. Following her tour of duty, Ruthie headed to New York City where she became a regular performer at various local folk venues. Atlantic Records got wind of Foster's talent and offered her a recording deal, with the intent of cultivating her as a budding pop star, but Foster wasn't interested in a pop career, preferring instead to explore the various strains of American roots music that had informed her childhood. When her mother fell ill in 1993, Foster left New York and her recording deal and returned to Texas to be with her family. She began working as a camera operator and production assistant at a television station in College Station, Texas while she cared for her mother, who passed in 1996. A year later in 1997, Foster self-released the album Full Circle, the success of which paved the way to a long relationship with the record label Blue Corn Music.

Blue Corn released the follow up album Crossover in 1999, Runaway Soul in 2002, and Stages (featuring a series of live tracks) in 2004. Stages marked a turning point in Foster's career, as the experience of a Ruthie Foster live show was able to be experienced by a wide audience. Foster's next release was Heal Yourself in 2006, followed by the studio album The Phenomenal Ruthie Foster in 2008 (produced by Papa Mali), and The Truth According to Ruthie Foster (produced by Grammy-winning producer Chris Goldsmith), recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis, in 2009, all released by Blue Corn Music.[2] The Truth According to Ruthie Foster earned Ruthie a Grammy Award Nomination for Best Contemporary Blues Album. A second album of Foster's live performances, Live At Antone's (CD and DVD), was released in 2011. In 2012, Ruthie and Blue Corn released the studio album Let It Burn, which featured special guests The Blind Boys of AlabamaWilliam Bell and the rhythm section of The Funky Meters, and was produced by Grammy-award winner John Chelew. Let It Burn earned Foster a second Grammy Nomination, this time for Best Blues Album, and was the vehicle for numerous Blues Music Awards won by Foster. Her most recent album, Promise of a Brand New Day, was released by Blue Corn Music in 2014.

Ruthie Foster's awards list has grown in the last few years. These awards include three Grammy nominations (Let It Burn for Best Blues Album, The Truth According to Ruthie Foster for Best Contemporary Blues Album, and Promise of a Brand New Day for Best Blues Album), her numerous wins at the Blues Music Awards, including three awards for Best Female Vocalist and one for DVD of the Year for Live At Antone's, and Foster's recent crown for Best Female Vocalist at the 2013 Austin Music Awards. In 2016, she was nominated for two Living Blues Awards and won the Koko Taylor Award for Best Traditional Female Blues Artist.

“…there is no denying the spirit.” -USA Today
“The one thing you can count on from Ruthie Foster anytime she steps onto a stage is being blown away by both her powerhouse voice and her familial warmth…the Texas singer-songwriter brought the standing room only crowd into her embrace, holding them gently in her grip like a long-lost cousin for almost two hours of song and story.” -Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“The energy she brings with just voice and guitar is stunning. Ruthie’s drawn comparisons to Ella and Aretha, but musically neither is really close. What she does have in common with Fitzgerald and Franklin is her irresistible blaze - it’s impossible to look away, even close the eyes, for one second.” -Philadelphia City Paper’
 

Hit Songs Include: Lord Remember Me, Runaway Soul and Set Fire to the Rain

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Jun
16
7:00 pm19:00

Jason Boland, Cody Canada, & Mike McClure

$160

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

 Music is having a moment. Listeners are crying out for something true––some meaty songs that’ll give us some comfort, even as they cut closer to the bone.

 Everyone is finally ready for the gritty, thundering country Jason Boland and the Stragglers have sharpened over almost 20 years’ worth of selling out roomy venues and commanding stages across the nation. And new album Squelch provides the ideal vehicle.

 “We’re just trying to make something that we're proud of,” lead songwriter and vocalist Boland says. “If any more people want to take notice of it, they’re welcome.”

 Since coming together in Stillwater, Oklahoma, Boland and his tightknit crew have sold more than half a million albums independently and earned a devoted following that’s swelled far beyond the band’s red dirt roots. At a Stragglers show, oil patch roughnecks, hippies, college kids, and intelligentsia all sway side-by-side like a traveling reincarnation of Austin’s Armadillo World Headquarters in its cosmic cowboy, Willie Nelson heyday.

 While the Stragglers draw from rock and folk, make no mistake: they traffic in unfiltered, unfettered honky-tonk, raw and lean. Equal parts subtle, meditative, and snarling, and often wickedly funny, Squelch is a deeply rooted exercise in exhuming beauty by trading smoke and mirrors for what’s real.

 “We pay homage, but we don't want to copy or be a throwback act,” Boland says. “All you can do is try to take the music that inspires you and take it further. And make it personal.” If he has felt any pressure to make his “personal” what others have in mind, it doesn’t show. Boland has never constructed an identity or sound for mass or even niche consumption. He is who he is, and he’s all in.

 Recorded at Orb Recording Studios in Austin and mixed at Sonic Ranch in El Paso, Squelch was produced by Jim Ward (At the Drive-In, Sparta, Sleepercar) and marks the band’s eighth time in the studio. Like two previous Stragglers’ albums, debut Pearl Snaps and 2013’s critically acclaimed Dark and Dirty MileSquelch was recorded and mixed directly to tape. “It's one thing when you can say, ‘Okay, now, engineer, you do your magic,’” Boland says. “There is no magic when you record and mix to tape. It is what it is. I think it’s a fuller, richer sound. And it’s just more honest.”

 Opener “Break 19” thumps brazenly, reveling in bassist Grant Tracy’s heart-pounding walks and punctuated by Nick Worley’s whirling fiddle, Brad Rice’s locomotive drumming, and newest Straggler Cody Angel’s achy pedal steel. There’s not a throwaway line to be found, as Boland’s deep baritone rumbles through a sly takedown of modern media and absolute certainty after copping to trying it all the wrong way first and realizing “the more I see, the less I claim to know.” It’s a fitting introduction to The Stragglers’ signature blend of social consciousness, self-awareness, and swing.

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Jun
23
7:00 pm19:00

The Black Lillies

$99

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

At the beginning of 2015, things had never looked better for The Black Lillies. Winning legions of fans through relentless touring and riding a wave of critical acclaim, the band had already successfully surpassed their PledgeMusic fundraising goals, selected a producer and booked studio time to record their new album when frontman Cruz Contreras was hit with unexpected news: two of the group’s five members would be amicably moving on. Contreras contemplated the group’s future and faced down a looming deadline to finish writing the new album for a yet-to-be-determined lineup.

“In the past, I might write a song once a month when I felt inspired, and at a much more leisurely pace,” explains Contreras, “but this time around, I realized I would have to write an entire record in two weeks before we hit the studio. I felt confident I could do it, but I also had no proof.”

The proof is now etched into vinyl with ‘Hard To Please,’ the band’s fourth studio album. It’s an alternately rip-roaring and deeply intimate record, showcasing both Contreras’ lyrical evolution as a writer and a more sonically sophisticated side of the band than we’ve heard before. Whether it was due to the pressure of the ticking clock, the injection of creative energy from recording with new faces, or simply the steadfast desire of a hardworking band to always outdo themselves, the album stands as the finest yet in The Black Lillies’ outstanding catalog.

When it came time to record, the bar had already been set high with the group’s previous releases, which were hailed as “buzzworthy, genre-mashing roots music” by Rolling Stone Country and praised everywhere from Vanity Fair and The Wall Street Journal to CMT and Entertainment Weekly. Their last album, 2013’s ‘Runaway Freeway Blues,’ climbed the Billboard country charts, landed on more than a dozen Best-Of lists, and dominated Americana radio, spending a whopping three months in the Top 5. The sound reflected their raucous live show, which prompted NPR’s Ann Powers to name them a top pick at SXSW, and has earned them festival slots from Bonnaroo to Stagecoach, as well as the honor of playing The Grand Ole Opry more than any other independent band in history.

In addition to the unusually compressed writing timeline, ‘Hard To Please’ is also unique in that it marks the band’s first time recording with an outside producer. Contreras handed the reins over to Grammy-winner Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, Johnny Cash, Red Hot Chili Peppers), who led the band into the legendary House of Blues Studio D, originally constructed in Memphis in the 1960’s and relocated to Nashville in 2010. The room had hosted everyone from Isaac Hayes to Stevie Ray Vaughan to The Eagles in its storied history, and it was outfitted with a custom API console originally commissioned by Ryan’s father, David Hewitt, for The Record Plant in New York City back in 1978. The list of artists who recorded on the console is a who’s who of music icons: Aretha Franklin, Eric Clapton, The Band, Stevie Wonder, Bruce Springsteen, The Rolling Stones, Ray Charles, David Bowie, Crosby Stills & Nash, Tom Petty, Prince, on and on.

Hewitt invited Band of Horses’ Bill Reynolds to join the sessions on bass, while Contreras brought along pedal steel player Matt Smith (Indigo Girls, Amy Ray) and Daniel Donato, a hotshot guitarist he discovered blowing the roof off of Robert’s Western World one night in Nashville. The new faces joined Contreras, Hewitt, and the band’s remaining members—drummer Bowman Townsend and vocalist Trisha Gene Brady—to craft the ten gripping tracks on ‘Hard To Please.’

None of it—the lineup, the studio, the producer, the console—would have made a lick of difference without the songs, though. Contreras penned part of the album during a bitter winter storm that hit the band’s hometown of Knoxville, TN.

“We got snowed in, so I just set up shop in the basement,” remembers Contreras. “Usually we tour so much that the instruments don’t get out of their cases when we’re home, but I had time there to set everything up in a circle around me and get to work.”

The album opens with the biting title track, one of several tunes written while Contreras was snowed in, which has been called “a funky barn burner shot through with blasts of brass and blues guitar” by Rolling Stone Country. It sets the tone lyrically and musically for a band that can weather any storm and accepts nothing less than their very best (no matter the pressure), as Contreras sings, “We got a long way to go and a short time to get there.” The driving drum intro and catchy guitar hook came out of a collaboration between Contreras and Townsend, which he describes as “a perfect example of sharing the creative process with other people and the band being stronger for it.” That collaborative spirit pays off in spades later on the record, when Contreras hands over lead vocal duties to Brady on the appropriately titled and utterly infectious “The First Time.”

While several songs came out of those snowstorm writing sessions, including the heartfelt, delicate “Desire” and “Dancin'”—a duet that’s sure to indulge audiences’ love of getting on their feet at Black Lillies shows—some of the songs were actually years in the making. “That’s The Way It Goes Down” was penned in a moment of unflinching self-reflection back in 2014, while “Broken Shore,” a solemn, epic rocker, tells the story of Contreras’ grandfather, who fought at Iwo Jima. “Bound To Roam” was written fittingly enough in a van, and the rollicking “40 Days and 40 Nights” recounts the band’s misadventures on their first national tour.

“I gave up my lease and put all my possessions on the sidewalk, and in 45 minutes they were gone,” says Contreras with a laugh. “That was a lot easier than moving. The very first show was actually at the Ryman Auditorium and then we played two other great gigs and it all went downhill after that. We had 40 shows in 40 nights. It’s not too funny when you’re in it, but time heals that way and now that we’re six years out I can joke about it.”

It’s nothing short of remarkable how far the band has come in those six years, both in terms of miles and in terms of personal and musical growth. Through the ups and the downs, they’ve established themselves as one of the hardest-working and most dynamic bands touring today. With a re-imagined six-piece live lineup that includes new additions Sam Quinn (the everybodyfields), Mike Seal (Jeff Sipe Trio, Larkin Poe) and Jonathan Keeney (Robinella), it won’t be hard to please Black Lillies fans, and with a an album this great, they’re sure to bring a whole lot of new ones into the fold, too.

Hit Songs Include: Hard to Please, Whiskey Angel and Smokestack Lady

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Jul
8
7:00 pm19:00

Susan Gibson

$90

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Susan Gibson is a Grammy award winning singer/songwriter from Wimberley, Texas.  She is a respected performer and writer with one of the top-selling country songs of all time under her belt - she wrote "Wide Open Spaces" that the Dixie Chicks cover and has six solo albums released nationally. 

Susan tours year-round and performs at a variety of festivals, listening rooms, and house concert venues.  She was also inducted into the West Texas Music Hall of Fame as 2009's Entertainer of the Year.  She released her 6th album, an EP titled “Remember Who You Are” in November 2016 and is also spending time leading workshops for kids and adults interested in songwriting.

Hit Songs Include: Wide Open Spaces, The Second Hand and Best of You

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Aug
11
7:00 pm19:00

Quiet Riot with Documentary

$280

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

QUIET RIOT is a rock & roll phenomenon. Famously described as the first heavy metal band to top the pop charts, the Los Angeles quartet became an overnight sensation thanks to their monster 1983 smash album Metal Health. Their followup album Condition Critical went double platinum and the band continued to record and tour throughout their 25 + year history.

QUIET RIOT continues their historic journey in 2012 with Metal Health founding member Frankie Banali who is joined by QUIET RIOT veteran bassist Chuck Wright and QUIET RIOT guitarist Alex Grossi from their last and most stable lineup. They are proud to announce their new vocalist Jizzy Pearl to complete the QUIET RIOT lineup.

The story of QUIET RIOT begins in 1980 when Kevin DuBrow formed a new band under his own name, working with Frankie Banali and a variety of musicians over the next few years before signing with Pasha/CBS Records, reverting back to the QUIET RIOT moniker, and entering the studio with new guitarist Carlos Cavazo and bassist Chuck Wright to start work on a new album. The year was 1982 and, following Randy Rhoads' well-documented death, former henchman Rudy Sarzo left Ozzy, replacing Chuck Wright who is the bass player on record for both the "Metal Health" and "Don't Wanna Let You Go" tracks, to complete the lineup and sessions for what would become 1983's Metal Health. Driven by the irresistible double whammy of the title track's muscular bass line and a raucous rendition of the old Slade chestnut "Cum on Feel the Noize," the album stormed up the U.S. charts, duly reaching the number one spot and going platinum five times over in the process at that time. The sales of Metal Health has now exceeded the 10 million mark worldwide to date.

QUIET RIOT returned to the studio to record 1984's Condition Critical, which went on to sell over 2 million copies in the US and included another chart-ready Slade cover in "Mama Weer All Crazee Now" and the self penned "Party All Night." In 1986 QUIET RIOT re-grouped to launch the QR III record, Sarzo had been replaced by former bassist Chuck Wright. Vocalist Paul Shortino stepped in and recorded 1988's simply named Quiet Riot with Banali, Cavazo, and new bassist Sean McNabb.

In 1991, DuBrow and Cavazo began working together once again, joined by Frankie Banali and eventually recording 1993's Terrified with bassist Kenny Hillery. Down to the Bone followed two years later with Chuck Wright back on bass, and in 1997, a one-off performance at a after show party hosted by industrial shock rocker Marilyn Manson who had requested to Banali that QUIET RIOT perform, lured bassist Rudy Sarzo back to the fold. 

With that lineup once again, QUIET RIOT hit the road playing venues across America, Europe and Asia. This lineup was captured on 1999's Alive and Well album, and 2001 saw the release of Guilty Pleasures. QUIET RIOT officially parted company with Rudy Sarzo and Carlos Cavazo in October of 2003. In 2004 DuBrow and Banali recruited guitarist Alex Grossi and bassist Chuck Wright and continued to tour nonstop throughout 2006 in America, Europe, South America and Asia. For the recording of Rehab in 2006, DuBrow and Banali entered the studio with bassist Tony Franklin and guitarist Neil Citron, both long time friends of Banali. QUIET RIOT with the lineup of DuBrow, Banali, Wright and Grossi continued to perform live worldwide until November of 2007 when sadly, Kevin DuBrow's singing career was cut short with his passing on November 25, 2007.

Frankie Banali's history with QUIET RIOT spans over 28 years and he has the distinction of being the only member of QUIET RIOT to have recorded on every single QUIET RIOT release from 1983's Metal Health through 2006's Rehab. After nearly three years since the loss of his friend and band mate Kevin DuBrow, and with careful consideration, soul searching and with the blessings and support of Kevin DuBrow's family, Frankie has decided to continue his journey and the musical legacy of QUIET RIOT along with bassist Chuck Wright, guitarist Alex Grossi and vocalist Jizzy Pearl.

@quietriot

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Aug
18
7:00 pm19:00

Matt the Electrician

$105

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Despite the name, Matt the Electrician is no longer an electrician, focusing instead on a music career that has spanned the course of two decades, a dozen records, and literally thousands of shows. It’s folk music for a modern age, rooted in lyrics that focus on the realities and challenges of the 21st century as opposed to, say, the old-school thrill of hopping trains.

“I don’t generally write mining disaster songs,”he explains. “I tend to write about things that have happened to me and my family. Songs about the small things in life, which, to me, are really the big things.”

With his newest project, Matt gets by with a little help from his friends. Throughout 2015 and 2016, he’s focusing on a string of 7-inch vinyl singles. Every new release will focus on collaborations with different artists who’ve crossed Matt’s path over the years, including the bluegrass band Wood & Wire (who appear on the very first installment of the vinyl series), experimental solo musician Little Brave, and others. Rather than record an entire album’s worth of material, then carefully plot the album’s release for months, Matt the Electrician will release the 7-inch records as they’re finished, with each new release following its predecessor by three or four months. The goal? To get new music to his fans as quickly and creatively as possible. The icing on the cake? Matt gets to extend the collaborative spirit that’s been present in his music ever since his very first gig in Pacific Grove, CA, when he invited his high school classmates to join him onstage.

“The coffee shop paid me in tips, free coffee and a sandwich,” he remembers of that teenaged gig. “I had to fill three hours, and I only had two songs, so I invited all the friends I knew kids from the school orchestra, friends, other kids who had started writing songs and the show wound up being ‘Matt and Friends.’ That was 25 years ago and that’s what I’m still doing.”

Years before moving to Texas and launching his career as a boundary-breaking, working-class folk musician, Matt Sever grew up on the West Coast. His parents, a union carpenter and a seamstress, played John Denver and Pete Seeger songs on the family record player, and Matt spent his earliest years surrounded by the things that would later fill his own music: acoustic guitars, timeless melodies, lyrics that celebrated the joys and heartaches of everyday life, and above all else a strong work ethic.

That work ethic served him well in the mid-1990s, when he moved to Austin in search of new horizons and better opportunities. Matt was already playing music by then, and in need of a steady day job to help pay the bills, he began working as an electrician, spending his days wiring houses in the sweltering Texas heat. Once quitting time came, he’d grab his guitar and drive himself to an evening show, usually taking the stage in his work boots and sweaty clothes. “Hi; I’m Matt the Electrician,” he’d tell the crowd, hoping his occupation would help explain his appearance. The name stuck, even after his growing fanbase at home as well as abroad, where he’s since become a frequently-booked musician throughout Japan and Europe allowed him to hang up his pliers for good.

Hit Songs Include: Accidental Thief, I Will Do the Breathing and Animal Boy

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Sep
1
7:00 pm19:00

Evening with Danika Holmes

$85

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Danika Holmes is a songwriter who was almost a doctor. He's a guitar aficionado who owns and operates his own guitar instruction company. Together they form the duo Danika Holmes featuring Jeb Hart, a soulful combination of acoustic pop and blues that hits the heart with their blended talents. 

Hailed as "a captivating singer in a truly soulful duo," by Emmy Award winning songwriter Trey Bruce, Holmes initially started as a solo artist, her songs playing on Sirius XM's Coffee House station and on 150 radio stations nationwide. Her belief is that a well written song can embody all emotions of the human existence and she articulates that beautifully with her slightly raspy yet gentle voice and truthful lyrics. 

Jeb Hart can tell a story with six strings - "I’ve seen some of the best guitarists that rock, blues and country have to offer." says Entertainment reporter Jim Renke. " Jeb Hart can hold his own with any of them. His heart and passion are matched only by his technical skills.” The multi-faceted Hart began playing music at the age of 9 - shortly thereafter he began a 16 year career of guitar instruction, opening his own company Six Month Guitar. Performing with various bands, ranging in genres from blues to rock, country to big band, Jeb found the partner he was looking for in Danika. 

Danika and Jeb are taking stages by storm - having opened for mainstream heavyweights such as Lyle Lovett, Dierks Bentley, Phil Vassar and others, their soulful and intoxicating sound lures in new fans daily.  For more information, show dates and new music, check out Danika & Jeb here

Hit Songs Include: Black Swan, Unlit Match, Living Your Dream and Bluebird

"Danika and Jeb came through Red Clay Theatre a while back.  I had watched the videos and listened in space face world, but wasn't prepared for what they gave... LIVE.... Y’all spread the word bout them, and catch 'em when you can.  They'll outgrow the little places soon.” -Eddie Owen of Eddie Owens Presents and formerly Eddie’s Attic.

“Danika Holmes isn’t just easy on these eyes. She’s a true American talent... I couldn’t stop listening!” -Mike Wolfe, American Pickers on History

“In Nashville, you have to stand in a long line as a new artist and do something fresh. I’ve seen Danika and Jeb play a few times around town and I’m always struck by her voice and her uniqueness in phrasing and especially tone. She’s a captivating singer in a truly soulful duo.” -Trey Bruce, Emmy Award Winning Songwriter 

“Danika Holmes puts her heart and soul into every performance. Her smile draws you in, her music keeps you there.” Madalyn Sklar, GoGirls Music

“I spent 25 years in the newspaper business, most of it as an entertainment reporter and editor.  I’ve seen some of the best guitarists and rock, blues and country have to offer. Jeb Hart can hold his own with any of them. His heart and passion are matched only by his technical skills.” - Jim Renke, Entertainment Reporter

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Sep
8
7:00 pm19:00

Bruce, Kelly & Band

$135

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

If Austin’s happily egalitarian music scene suddenly switched to a monarchy, Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis might have to learn to perform while balancing hefty crowns. Already reigning as one of Americana music’s coolest couples, their latest release, Our Year, elevates them closer to the lofty territory once occupied by beloved royals Johnny ‘n’ June and George ‘n’ Tammy.

Not that they would ever seek royal treatment, of course. This duo is way too down-to-earth for “Downton Abbey” airs. They’re Texans, after all. Robison is a Bandera boy; Oklahoma-born Willis, an Army brat, got here as soon as she could. They fell in love while harmonizing together, though it took them until 2013 to release their first officially billed joint effort (not counting four children): Cheater’s Game.

Cheaters Game was very well received and Willis and Robison felt the wind at their backs. They were eager to return to the studio.
“With this album, we feel like we’re completing the picture,” Willis says. “These songs have been poking us on the shoulder, dying to be heard. We just didn’t feel like we were done. We had more to say.”

Working again in Nashville with producer Brad Jones, they delivered their musical thoughts in 10 outstanding tracks, from formidable originals to well-honed covers including a knockout version of the Tom T. Hall-penned “Harper Valley PTA.” Jeannie C. Riley’s 1968 hit sounds like a classic all over again in the hands of this pair — and the chicken-pickin’, mandolin- plucking, shaker-grooving players who back them on this tart tale.

On their shared website, Willis describes how she learned the song in secret in order to zing her hubby for veering off the setlist during one of their shared performances, dubbed “The Bruce and Kelly Show.” It went over so well, they not only added it to their set, they made it the album’s leadoff single.

Competitive streaks aside, their harmonies align perfectly on such excellently chosen melodies as the country-rocker “Motor City Man,” by the late Walter Hyatt; T Bone Burnett’s “Shake Yourself Loose,” a beautifully melancholy duet; “I’ll Go To My Grave Loving You,” a fiddle- sweetened Statler Brothers hit; and “(Just Enough to Keep Me) Hanging On,” the Ira Allen/Buddy Mize-penned nugget Vern Gosdin recorded with Emmylou Harris.

Willis and Robison also chose “Departing Louisiana,” by Robyn Ludwick, the youngest of three Robison singer-songwriter siblings. (“It’s about time we all started raiding her material,” brother Bruce says.) Darden Smith and Robison co-wrote the waltz-time “Carousel,” which he describes as “a classic country weeper.” Monte Warden collaborated with Robison on the bittersweet ode to youthful innocence, “Anywhere But Here,” which Willis describes as “classic Bruce poetry.” She penned the bluesy honky-tonker “Lonely For You” with Paul Kennerley; and they plucked the album’s title track, a Zombies song, from their annual Christmas show.

“I love the fresh-start, hopeful-promise aspect of this song and the nod to struggles that have been overcome,” Willis says of the Chris White penned tune, which features banjo, steel and dobro backing by Nashville session ace Pete Finney and Austin’s own Geoff Queen.

She’s not shy about admitting some of those struggles are attributable to married life and parenthood, especially when balanced between two musicians with their own careers. Hers began at 17, when she joined her then-boyfriend’s rockabilly band. They moved from Virginia to Austin, where her heartache-meets-honky-tonk voice lured MCA Records’ Tony Brown into signing her. The label positioned her as a country ingénue, a role she played in the Tim Robbins film, “Bob Roberts,” but she sought a different path and they parted ways. Willis finally achieved widespread recognition with 1999’s What I Deserve.

By then, she had met and married Robison, who has become one of country and Americana’s most respected songwriters. His compositions have become massive hits for George Strait “Desperately”), Tim McGraw (“Angry All the Time”) and the Dixie Chicks (“Travelin’ Soldier”). He also has recorded on his own and collaborated with brother Charlie and others as a songwriter, singer, guitarist and harmonica player and producer/engineer.

“Kelly has been singing [with me] since the first recording I made,” Robison says, “and she was the first person who ever recorded one of my songs. We’ve never stopped collaborating.”

The difference now is that they’re not assisting one another; they’re full partners.

“It’s not one of us running the show. It’s the two of us figuring out how to play together,” Willis explains. And that creates a different vibe, especially live. “I almost never worry when I’m onstage with Bruce because I know he’s got my back,” she adds. “If something goes wrong, he can completely take the reins.”

The desire to capture that live dynamic — their “swampier, grittier side” — drove the creation of Our Year, Willis says. Robison calls their style “a modern take on classic country music, without being retro.”

“I really feel like we came up with a sound, the way that the vocals blend together, and it rejuvenated me as an artist and a performer, which I really needed after 20 years,” he admits. “There’s a lot of great duos, and I love that. That close-harmony singing, it’s real organic; it’s a really lovely thing.

“I have to say, I think that Kelly’s voice is just a gift. She’s one of the greatest singers there is out there.”

Clearly, mutual respect is a major part of their glue as a couple, but making these albums has brought them closer, Willis says, adding, “Having these records that we both love is a really positive product of us being together.”

The original motivation was bittersweet, however; Willis was rocked by the death of close friend and fellow musician Amy Farris.

“I realized that I would never get to sing together with her again, and I realized what I had lost. And when you have something special, you can’t turn your back on that,” she says. “Bruce and I had that something special.”

They knew it the moment they joined their voices in song, which happened the night they met at an Austin party, and they still haven’t lost the thrill of making that sweet, singular sound. “I love listening to it. I love playing it,” Robison says. “And I love the sound of the band, how it all comes together. I really do. It’s been a great thing. It’s so much fun. It’s really interesting to think of where we’ll go from here.”

Maybe they’ll play Buckingham Palace one day, though night clubs and dance halls are more their style. But wherever Our Year takes them doesn’t really matter, Robison says, because they’re having the time of their lives.

Hit Songs Include: Cheater's Game, Angry All the Time and Lonely for You

Doors Open: 6:30 PM

Nov
10
7:00 pm19:00

Dale Watson

$115

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Dale Watson, keeper of the true country music flame, latest album Call Me Insane, was recorded in Austin with veteran producer Lloyd Maines (Robert Earl Keen, Jerry Jeff Walker, etc.). The Austin-based honky-tonker carries on in the tradition of Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson with his “Ameripolitan” brand of American roots music.

Album highlights include “Jonesin’ For Jones,” a love song to the music of the legendary George Jones, “A Day At A Time,” about “getting by by barely getting by;” “Call Me Insane,” the album’s moody title track; “Bug Ya For Love,” a fun warning to all the single ladies, and “Mamas Don’t Let Your Cowboys Grow Up To Be Babies.” (Yes, it is an answer song to the Waylon Jennings/Willie Nelson hit.) “Crocodile Tears” is a tear-in-your-beer country song that sounds like an instant classic and “Burden Of The Cross” reveals Watson’s serious side.

Call Me Insane was recorded in Austin by Watson and his ace touring band, “His Lone Stars”: Don Pawlak (pedal steel), Mike Bernal (drums & percussion), and Chris Crepps (upright bass & background vocals). Dale plays electric guitar throughout and Lloyd Maines added acoustic guitar. They were joined in the studio by Danny Levin on piano and the Honky Tonk Horns: Jon Blondell (trombone), Joey Colarusso (saxophone), and Ricky White (trumpet). 

“Having known Lloyd over 20 years and worked with him as a musician, I knew he was a great guy and picker," Watson says. "But having Lloyd produce your record is like letting your mom in your kitchen. You know you’re gonna like what comes out and it's amazing how such basic ingredients can be made even better. He is an artists' artist.

The admiration is mutual. "I've been a Dale Watson fan since I played steel guitar on some of his early records," Maines says of the sessions. "My early musical influences are the same as Dale's. We both grew up playing real country music. Dale is one of a very short list of today's artists who still keeps it real country. I'm honored that he asked me to produce his new record. I think he knew that I would maintain the integrity of his passion for the music."

Dubbed "the silver pompadoured, baritone beltin', Lone Star beer drinkin', honky-tonk hellraiser" by The Austin Chronicle, Watson sat in with Jimmy Kimmel’s house band as a guest on Jimmy Kimmel Live (ABC) from SXSW 2015. He also emceed the first ever SXSW “Ameripolitan” showcase featuring the best of Honky-tonk, Outlaw Country, Rockabilly and Texas Swing music.

Since the release of El Rancho Azul in 2013, Watson’s profile has risen considerably via appearances on The Late Show with David Letterman (CBS), Austin City Limits and The Sun Sessions(PBS) and as a guest on NPR’s Wait Wait... Don’t Tell Me. A veteran touring artist and consummate entertainer, he is on the road more than 300 days a year. He also put his money where his heart is and took over ownership of two struggling Texas honky-tonks, the Little Longhorn Saloon in Austin (home of Chicken $#!+ Bingo) and The Big T Roadhouse in St. Hedwigs (outside San Antonio).  If not on the road, he and His Lone Stars perform at one of them each Sunday.

Dale has flown the flag for classic honky-tonk for over two decades. He’s christened his brand of American roots “Ameripolitan” to differentiate it from current crop of Nashville-based pop country. The Alabama-born, Texas-raised Watson may be the hardest working entertainer today and is rapidly approaching legendary status.  He is a country music maverick, a true outlaw who stands alongside Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and George Strait as one of the finest country singers and songwriters from the Lone Star State.

Hit Songs Include: I Lie When I Drink, Nashville Rash and Country My Ass

Doors Open: 6:30 PM


Feb
25
7:00 pm19:00

Tony Ramey and Family

$90

Entertainment as it should be! Get ready to be spoiled! Come enjoy an intimate show with close free parking, full 4 course dinner, luxurious seating, table service, and all gratuities included!

Tony Ramey grew up in West Virginia on Bluegrass and Bill Withers; found Willie, Waylon, Cash, and Kristofferson at eleven, who compelled him to write songs; then heard Steve Earle who made him move to Guitar Town to hone his craft; and he left for Texas when the road called him out again...

Somewhere in the middle of all that he acquired a Masters, taught at a university while working on his PhD, and garnered Gold and Platinum Records as a songwriter in Nashville. Currently he tours the US and Texas, where he has been named 2016's Independent Artist of the Year by the Texas Country Music Association. 

With the exception of his latest release Soul Survivor, featuring a duet with the iconic Willie Nelson (also a new fan of his music), Tony Ramey has not caught much press. Yet, he is still grabbing the attention of industry people, and growing his audience by leaps and bounds because of his undeniable prowess as a singer/songwriter. Tony has spent most of his music career flying below the media radar and refusing to don make-up for a camera. Not one for glitz and glamour, he prefers the troubadour life-style on the road, and the solace of his writer's getaway between shows where he says he can "be alone with nature, his thoughts, and the eternal spring of the Art Spirit." Tony holds most music review publications under suspicion because of the incestuous tendencies of industry circles. During an appearance at a writer's symposium, he was reported telling a group of patrons that he "survived education, and though he hardly came out of it unscathed, at least [he] wasn't almost annihilated by the jaws of commerce and media." 

Hit Songs Include: Dreaming Enough to Get Me By, The Bible, The Bottle, and the Gun, Bullets First, and Heroes in the Field

Doors Open: 6:30 PM